Little Hotels in South Wales

The Plough Inn

, Llandeilo
.

A 4 star boutique hotel and restaurant with gardens and terraces overlooking the Towy valley.

Guest rating 9.4

Harbourmaster Hotel

, Aberaeron
.

A charming quayside boutique hotel with bar and restaurant, right beside the harbour in Aberaeron.

Guest rating 9.3

The Town House at Brecon

, Brecon
.

A luxury boutique B&B in a Grade II listed Georgian house in a quiet corner of Brecon. Handy for the Brecon Beacons.

Guest rating 9.9

Kidwelly Farmhouse

, Kidwelly
.

Traditional farmhouse bed and breakfast on a working farm on a hill overlooking the coast and beach near Pembrey.

Guest rating 9.6

Penally Abbey

, Tenby
.

A grand period house with views across Carmarthen Bay.

Guest rating 9.4

Penrhiw Hotel

, St Davids
.

An elegant stone-built period house in large gardens close to the Pembrokeshire coast and the smallest city in Britain.

Guest rating 9.5

The Grove of Narberth

, Narberth
.

A luxury country house hotel and restaurant in Pembrokeshire with awards galore. Ideal for walkers, foodies and lovers of spectacular scenery.

Guest rating 9.5

Peterstone Court

, Brecon
.

A country house hotel, restaurant and spa in the Brecon Beacons.

Guest rating 8.9

Lincoln House Private Hotel

, Cardiff
.

Affordable luxury in a Victorian townhouse hotel in a leafy street close to the centre of Cardiff.

Guest rating 9.2

Trefloyne Manor

, Tenby
.

A manor house hotel just outside Tenby with an award-winning restaurant, the Dovecote spa and its own golf course.

Guest rating 9.3

Kidwelly Farm Cottage

, Kidwelly
.

A four bedroom self-catering barn conversion on a working farm near the coast between the Gower Peninsula and Pembrokeshire.

Guest rating 9.2

Kidwelly Glamping

, Kidwelly
.

Glamorous camping in a luxury four-berth tent, situated on a working farm near the Gower Peninsula and Pembrokeshire.

Guest rating 9.2
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Reasons to visit South Wales

South Wales is home to the capital city of Wales: Cardiff. Therefore it's not just the seat of the Welsh Assembly but a centre of culture, sport and entertainment. The BBC has one of it's biggest studios there.

It's also home to some of the most fantastic countryside in Britain, from the wild hills of the Brecon Beacons to lush wooded valleys of the Usk and the Wye. As well as the natural scenery, the Usk and Wye valleys claim the largest number of castles per square mile in Great Britain (though I think the fewest square miles per castle would be more accurate). No matter whether you're looking for castles or scenery though, the whole area is full of opportunities for pleasant exercise; walking, cycling, horse-riding, canoeing and more.

Then for visitors who like to keep within sight of the sea, all those same pleasures can be found on the Gower peninsula and in Pembrokeshire. In between Carmarthen Bay is filled with vast expanses of sandy beaches and very few people. It's perfect for getting-away-from-it-all. There are more great beaches in Swansea Bay too, as well as Swansea itself, the Mumbles and Portcawl.

Not so long ago, South Wales was the biggest producer of coal in the world. At the time, that didn't always make for the prettiest of places but now that has changed. The old industrial areas have been re-purposed. Old docks in Milford Haven, Swansea and Cardiff have become marinas full of yachts, bars, shops and restaurants. The Cardiff barrage has turned Cardiff Bay from tidal mud to a water-sports paradise, and the Cardiff waterfront is a magnet for just about everyone. The famous "Valleys" have lost their slag-heaps and now there are numerous monuments to the industrial past. Museums and attractions of all sorts even include the opportunity to go down inside a coal mine.

Eating out in South Wales is always a pleasure. Every international cuisine imaginable is on offer in the towns and cities, but the best dining experiences are those that showcase Welsh produce. There's Welsh lamb of course, and the clean waters of the Bristol Channel furnish seafood and fish in abundance. Plus, there is South Wales' unique contribution to gastronomy: laverbread.

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